Education & Research
Books/Magazines
Film/TV/Video
Website Photography
Search

 

LA COUNTY FAIR - BEE BOOTH

_______________________________________________________________________________________

BACKYARD BEEKEEPING

Take Action & Update
Ordinance 
Hive Registration
Legalization Articles
Becoming an Urban Beekeeper 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

HELP SAVE THE HONEY BEES!
Take Action
Articles, Legislation, Etc.
        _______________________________________            

Equipment, Supplies (Local)



Welcome to the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association!

For over 130 years the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association has been serving the Los Angeles Beekeeping Community. Our group membership is composed of commercial and small scale beekeepers, bee hobbyists, and bee enthusiasts. So whether you came upon our site by design or just 'happened' to find us - welcome! Our primary purpose is the care and welfare of the honeybee. We achieve this through education of ourselves and the general public, supporting honeybee research, and practicing responsible beekeeping in an urban environment. 
 

"The bee is more honored than other animals, not because she labors, but because she labors for others."        Saint John Chrysostom

LACBA ANNUAL HOLIDAY DINNER 
At Pickwick Gardens
1001 Riverside Drive, Burbank, CA 91506
Monday, December 5, 2016 6PM-9PM
Details: http://www.losangelescountybeekeepers.com/events/

 

Next LACBA Meeting: Next LACBA meeting is Monday, January 2, 2017. Open: 6:45P.M./Start: 7:00P.M. 

Beekeeping Class 101:
  We have completed the 2016 Season of Beekeeping Class 101. Please check back in mid-January 2017 for information regarding further beekeeping classes. Thank you! 

Check out our Facebook page for lots of info and updates on bees; and please remember to LIKE US: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping 

THE LATEST BUZZ:  

Monday
Dec052016

LACBA Annual Holiday Dinner - Monday, December 5, 2016

LOS ANGELES COUNTY BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION ANNUAL HOLIDAY DINNER 
 

WHERE: Pickwick Gardens
1001 Riverside Dr.
Burbank, CA 91506
Conference Center 

WHEN: Monday, December 5, 2016
TIME: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM  (Doors open at 6, we dine about 6:30)

In case you didn't get the Evite email, please RSVP at the Evite pagePickwick GardensMap.

ON THE AGENDA:  Our president, Keith Roberts, will be speaking about his visions for our future. We will be voting on new officers, and ratifying our legalization as a 501(c)3 non-profit!

WHO: This is a family-friendly open event - feel free to bring your spouse, partner, kids, and friends.

HOW MUCH: $10/person.  

WHAT TO BRING: Please bring either an appetizer or dessert to share (6-8 servings is plenty).
Potluck by last name: A-M Desserts  N-Z Appetizers    

RAFFLE: Tickets are $1. Members renewing for 2017 get 5 free tickets. Please bring any items you'd like to contribute to the raffle on the night of the dinner.

CATERING: Once again, we are so pleased to announce our wonderful dinner will be provided by Outback Catering (LACBA Member, Doug Noland).  Beverages will be provided by Pickwick Gardens. 

Monday
Dec052016

CSBA Honors Clyde Steese with the 2016 Young Beekeeper of the Year Award

California State Beekeepers Association 
2016 Young Beekeeper of the Year
Clyde Steese 

A young man he is not.  A young beekeeper whom the bees have taught many lessons he is.  He is a successful (meaning the bees are paying for themselves with a little $ left over) 1st generation beekeeper.  Honey bees found him when they swarmed into a box in his backyard about 16 years ago.  He could not find anyone to take the bees or remove them for a reasonable cost so he decided to keep them and gave them a home.  Soon the back yard was overrun with bee hives, the neighbors were starting to complain, and more importantly his wife was starting to tell him he had to do something about all the bees. 

He connected with his local Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association and soon found an alternate location to pursue his new passion.  When he was up to about 30 colonies, he purchased a 24 foot flatbed truck, no forklift and no place to park a truck that size.  What do you do?  Call a friend.  Fast forward: 

He has served as Vice President and President of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association and currently is on the Board of Directors.  His most notable contribution has been as coordinator for the LACBA annual fundraiser/bee display at the Los Angeles County Fair going on too many years to remember. 

He is currently serving a term as a member of the Certified Farmers Market Advisory Committee that advises CDFA  on issues concerning Direct Marketing of Agricultural Products and Farmers Markets.  

He gives back with plenty of advice and lessons learned by teaching newbees at monthly Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association bee classes.    

Just a few of the lessons learned include: 

Do not buy a bunch of used equipment:  You may just inherit a bad case of foul brood.                      

Do not spend a lot of $ on an untested solution to varroa and always go back and test for mites to see if your plan for surviving with mites is working:  $5000 worth of Russian bees and queens that did not make it through the winter.

What to do when your truck breaks down with a full load of bees:  Blown water pump on the International flatbed truck with a full load of hives.  Fortunately only 1/4 mile from the top of the grade and was able to limp to the top before all the coolant ran out of the engine.  From there a 3 mile coast with no power steering and limited amount of air for the brakes.  2 right turns another 1/4 mile and a left turn into the driveway close enough to unload the bees and run them to the drop location with the forklift.  Then call your wife at 1am to come and get you, a 2 hour drive from home.

Have a plan in place for a flat tire:  Blown tire at about midnight on a Sunday night with a full truck load of bees and still a 3 hour drive ahead of you.

Always securely tie down your load even if you are only going 100 yds. so a 3000 lb. tote of sugar syrup does not fall off your truck, split open, and flow down hill through the back door of your partner’s house and into his wife’s kitchen.  

Beekeeping keeps Clyde Steese young.

Stubbornness and persistence are virtues.

(Note: Congratulations, Clyde. Thank you for all you do for the betterment of honey bees, beekeepers, and the beekeeping community. ~ LACBA)

Monday
Dec052016

LACBA Members at the 2016 CSBA Convention

From November 15-17, 2016, over 20 members of the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association joined over 300 beekeepers for the 127th Annual Calfornia State Beekeepers Association convention at the Kona-Kai Resort in San Diego, CA. What a great time we had mingling with commercial & backyard beekeepers to learn more about honey bees and beekeeping. We heard about the latest bee research from some of the top educators and researchers in the industry. Vendors were on hand demonstrating the latest beekeeping equipment and supplies.    

This is one of the best bee conferences in the country and we look forward to next year. We had a wonderful time and hope you can join us. Check out our photo album on our LACBA Facebook page.  

 Some of our LACBA members gather outside the Kona-Kai
 

 LACBA members check out the newest Hummerbee!

 
CSBA Awards Banquet 

(Note: Thank you to everyone for the great pictures for our CSBA 2016 Photo Albumon our LACBA Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/losangelesbeekeeping/: Eva Andrews, Robin Finkelstein, Bill Lewis, Misty Mussenden, Joy Pendell, Bill Rathfelder, and Jon Reese.)  

Monday
Dec052016

CSBA News Update: December 2, 2016

California State Beekeepers Association   From Joy Pendell, CSBA Media Director  December 2, 2016

CSBA News Update for your reading enjoyment. Happy reading! 

Disclaimer: Inclusion of items in this email does not imply CSBA endorsement unless such endorsement is specifically stated.

Nice to Read  

WAS – News From The World Of Beekeeping

WAS – News From The World Of Beekeeping

WAS – November WAS Journal 

Catch The Buzz – Honey Wars: Crime And Killings In New Zealand’s Booming Manuka Industry

ABC - Honey Bee Health Depends On Almond Grower, Beekeeper Communication

Agriculture.Com - The Hunt For A New Secretary Of Ag

Catch The Buzz – Mustard Farmers Join Forces To Protect British Honey Bees

Catch The Buzz – The Bee Informed Partnership Kicks Off A Fund Raising Program To Help The Bees. You Can Help!

Phys.Org - Why Brexit Could Be Bad News For Bees 

Catch The Buzz – Veterinarians’ Loans Repaid For Working In Rural Communities

The Kim & Jim Show – Webinar, Dec 8th: “What’s New For 2017”

Student Science - Sweet: Is Honey The Key To The Next-Generation Of Antimicrobials?

Catch The Buzz – Feds Hit Brakes On Loans To Big Farms. Do The Environmental Evaluation Before You Ask For A Loan.

Catch The Buzz – U.S. Organic Farmland Reached 4.1 Million Acres In 2016, A New Record

Catch The Buzz – Court Fails To Protect Bees And Beekeepers. Pesticide-Coated Seeds Remain Unregulated By EPA As Pollinator Populations Plummet.

Catch The Buzz – Protecting Bees From Pesticides Just Got Easier With The Release By Oregon State University Of A Smartphone App

Catch The Buzz – Seedless Fruit Varieties Seen As Food Security Boost 

Catch The Buzz – Bees Use A Variety Of Senses And Memory Of Previous Experiences When Deciding Where To Forage For Pollen, Research Suggests.

ABF – November E-Buzz 

ABC - Almond Conference, Sacramento, CA Dec 6-8th 

“Bee Audacious” Conference, San Raphael, CA Dec 14th

California Honey Festival – Woodland, CA, May 6th, 2017

UC Davis – Honey & Pollination Center Newsletter 

2017 North American Beekeeping Conference & Tradeshow Agenda 

USDA - National Honeybee Disease Survey in Southern CA

Request For Honeydew

“Folks, the fungi that grow on the honeydew of scale insects are called Sooty moulds. I was looking for CA producer of honeydew honey that I could try to grow my fungi on. Can you help?” Please contact Martin MacKenzie at mmackenzie@fs.fed.us or 209-288-6348 

Request To Visit An Apiary

“I'm a student from Richardson Middle School. I am part of a team that participates in FIRST Lego League and we are doing a project about Colony Collapse Disorder. We were wondering if we could come visit your bee farm to learn about bees.” Please contact Cindy at beeintelligent1@gmail.com.

Request for TV show

“Hi CA BeeKeepers!! This might be a random message to receive but I'm a casting producer for a new CBS show called Candy Crush it's an upcoming competition game show based off the popular mobile game. We're looking for dynamic, diverse duos and would love to have at least a duo of Beekeepers represented on the show! I'd personally love to invite you and your team to apply for this fun opportunity!!! It's going to be a one-of-a kind experience to win a HUGE CASH PRIZE. 

More info on the show: 

NOW CASTING NATIONWIDE: Teams of 2 for CBS’ New Live Action Game Show: CANDY CRUSH! Win a big cash prize!

It’s time for you and a partner to test you CANDY CRUSH skills on our revolutionary interactive stage. We want outgoing CANDY CRUSH fans of all levels who want to compete in our CANDY CRUSH ARENA to win a big cash prize!

To apply, please email amanda@Kasstinginc.com ASAP with: - Names - Phone numbers - Emails - Photos - Ages (open to all ages, 18+) - City/States - Occupations 

* You must be a legal US Resident and 18+ to be considered. Please let me know if you or anyone there is interested and I'd be happy to walk you through the audition process. Thank you!”

Saturday
Dec032016

You're a Bee. This Is What It Feels Like

 The New York Times    By Joanna Klein   December 2, 2016

A honey bee gathering pollen on a white flower. Dagmar Sporck/EyeEm, via Getty ImagesSet your meetings, phone calls and emails aside, at least for the next several minutes. That’s because today you’re a bee.

It's time to leave your hive, or your underground burrow, and forage for pollen. Pollen is the stuff that flowers use to reproduce. But it’s also essential grub for you, other bees in your hive and your larvae. Once you’ve gathered pollen to take home, you or another bee will mix it with water and flower nectar that other bees have gathered and stored in the hive. But how do you decide which flowers to approach? What draws you in?

In a review published last week in the Journal Functional Ecology, researchers asked: What is a flower like from a bee’s perspective, and what does the pollinator experience as it gathers pollen? And that's why we're talking to you in the second person: to help you understand how bees like you, while hunting for pollen, use all of your senses — taste, touch, smell and more — to decide what to pick up and bring home.

Maybe you're ready to go find some pollen. But do you even know where to look?

Good question. How about an answer?
No, I’m an expert bee. Get me out of this hive.